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Thursday, June 30, 2011

Anna Marie Sewell Named as Edmonton’s Poet Laureate

imageAnna Marie Sewell can add Poet Laureate to her impressive list of artistic accomplishments. The writer of poetry, theatre, stories and songs becomes the City of Edmonton’s fourth Poet Laureate on July 1, 2011.

Her first book of poetry, Fifth World Drum, was nominated for numerous awards including the Stephan G. Stephansson Award. City of Edmonton Book Prize, the Alberta’s Readers’ Choice Award and the ReLit award. The book won critical acclaim across Canada and I’m looking forward to reading it, now that it’s back on my radar.

Anna Marie Sewell writes a blog, Fifth World Journal at http://asewell.frontenachouse.com

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Book Review: The Water Man’s Daughter by Emma Ruby-Sac

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Congratulations to Emma Ruby-Sach on her debut novel, The Water Man’s Daughter. I really enjoyed this mystery. I never think that I am a mystery reader, but there was something about this title in the M&S catalogue that caught my attention. I’m pretty sure it was the bright cover but the description made it sound more like a literary novel than a mystery. I wasn’t disappointed.

This murder mystery takes place in South Africa, and the murdered man is Peter Mathews, a Canadian business man whose company is responsible for the privatization of the water supply in Johannesburg. His murder takes place in one of the townships and is rather grisly.

Claire, his daughter, arrives from Canada hoping to find some answers about what happened. She is put in the care of Nomsulwa, a local activist who dug up the water company pipes only days before the murder. Nomsulwa is tasked with touring Claire about by Zembe Afrika, our third female lead. Zembe is a policewoman in the township and is struggling to balance her community sentiments with her work ambitions.

All three women are fascinating characters and The Water Man’s Daughter is such a great read because of that. Claire is struggling with understanding her personal relationship with her father and her objective understanding of the work he was doing in South Africa. Nomsulwa is struggling with her desire to hate Claire and her water company connections while sympathizing with Claire’s broken allusions of her father. And Zembe is stuck trying to protect those she can in the community while turning a blind eye to injustices that in the end serve the community.

Emma Ruby-Sachs certainly writes like she’s no stranger to publishing novels. The twists and turns had me going until the end.

Book Review: The Water Man’s Daughter by Emma Ruby-Sac

image

Congratulations to Emma Ruby-Sach on her debut novel, The Water Man’s Daughter. I really enjoyed this mystery. I never think that I am a mystery reader, but there was something about this title in the M&S catalogue that caught my attention. I’m pretty sure it was the bright cover but the description made it sound more like a literary novel than a mystery. I wasn’t disappointed.

This murder mystery takes place in South Africa, and the murdered man is Peter Mathews, a Canadian business man whose company is responsible for the privatization of the water supply in Johannesburg. His murder takes place in one of the townships and is rather grisly.

Claire, his daughter, arrives from Canada hoping to find some answers about what happened. She is put in the care of Nomsulwa, a local activist who dug up the water company pipes only days before the murder. Nomsulwa is tasked with touring Claire about by Zembe Afrika, our third female lead. Zembe is a policewoman in the township and is struggling to balance her community sentiments with her work ambitions.

All three women are fascinating characters and The Water Man’s Daughter is such a great read because of that. Claire is struggling with understanding her personal relationship with her father and her objective understanding of the work he was doing in South Africa. Nomsulwa is struggling with her desire to hate Claire and her water company connections while sympathizing with Claire’s broken allusions of her father. And Zembe is stuck trying to protect those she can in the community while turning a blind eye to injustices that in the end serve the community.

Emma Ruby-Sachs certainly writes like she’s no stranger to publishing novels. The twists and turns had me going until the end.